Wolfowitz: The World Bank staff hate him already

For everyone interested in the Wolfowitz appointment, I strongly recommend World Bank President, a blog devoted to the issue in its title. From it, I learn that the World Bank staff is already expressing concerns that staff views should play a role in the selection of the next Bank president, and that you can e-sign a statement of concern sponsored by the European Network on Debt and Development.

This might even prove more entertaining than nominating Bono would have.

15 thoughts on “Wolfowitz: The World Bank staff hate him already

  1. ntce tht y kp sng th wrd “ht” t dscrb th atttd f th Wrld Bnk’s “stff” nd vn th “nstttn” twrd Mr. Wlfwtz.

    Tht’s n bsrdly strng wrd t s. thnk y’r prjctng.

  2. I’m surprised no one seems to have read the rather humorous eric alterman-wolfowitz encounter, and instead go with a cardboard cutout take on the guy:

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7127721/#050308

    One of the main reasons I decided Wolfowitz was of a fundamentally different character than the rest of these guys was the way he braved the rude boos and jeers from a demonstration of right-wing Jews by speaking to them of the need to respect and address the causes of Palestinian suffering. Given the obvious influence he enjoys with the president and all of his advisers, the natural trust of Israel he gets from his pedigree, and the fact that he did what he did so publicly, he would be, I think, not only acceptable to ?moderate? Palestinians and almost every stripe of Israeli, but also to the powerful Israel lobby in Washington.

    Why, I asked him, didn?t the Bush administration act more precipitously in Liberia? It could have saved tens of thousands of lives and scored political points against people like me who have, to put it politely, a hard time taking the humanitarian arguments for the Iraq war seriously. Wolfowitz did not really disagree with this. He said he was glad he was able to get the administration to act when it did. He clearly wanted to leave the impression that he would have liked it to happen earlier -without explicitly criticizing his own administration for not having done it. He spoke of the logistical difficulties of finding the necessary troops and of what happens after you get rid of the bad guys. (Hmmmm)

  3. this took before Bush publicly nominated him, whats funny is this:

    There was a lot of talk of whether Wolfowitz would take over the World Bank. Henry Kissinger came over and told him he was glad he turned down the job.

  4. Bush’s 2nd term appointments shouldn’t surprise anyone. Faced with international intransigence, what good does a kindler, gentler approach do?

    Bush’s first term was when the U.S. was willing to take our detractors seriously, but that opportunity was squandered by the invective of your leaders.

    It won’t end with the next election, either. While the Bush administration is the logical lightning rod for criticism regarding U.S. foreign policy decisions, the real driver is the U.S voting base, and it’s pretty disgusted with the U.N., France, Germany et al.

    To put it another way; Bush at least tried to reconcile U.S.-Euro relations, and U.S.-U.N. relations. The next president won’t.

  5. FelixUSA,
    in what meaningful way has Bush tried to reconcile U.S.-Euro relations ?

    I can’t say what the next president will or won’t do, as I don’t know who the candidates for next presidential term are. Neither do you.

  6. Aahahahah

    I live in the US among middle aged “educated” american people, despite the fact that they traveled outside this country they no nothing about Europe construction and are certainly not against the UN.

    Bush tried to reconcile with europe, what a joke and you know it.
    How can the world take seriously someone who claim that nuclear proliferation is bad and spend a lot of money to develop much more efficient and deadly nuclear weapons.
    With this new nuclear bomb they will be abl eto eradicate lets say Fajulah in Iraq with less side effect. Nice on the paper but it open the door to the real armagedon.
    Bush is slowly preparing the world for a real wolrd war in a few decade.

  7. “in what meaningful way has Bush tried to reconcile U.S.-Euro relations ?”

    Do I have to list everything Colin Powell did during the first term, or can you remember it yourself? Most of his schedule was spent trying to appease the demands of our “allies”.

    “I can’t say what the next president will or won’t do, as I don’t know who the candidates for next presidential term are. Neither do you.”

    The successful candidate’s platform will resonate with the voters views. Take a spin around the U.S. weblogs if you want to get an idea of the voters views on the U.N. and obstructionist parts of Europe.

  8. FelixUSA,
    You are embarassing yourself, please stop while you are behind.

    The Secretary of State Does what the President Demands not the Allies. His (or her) job, is to sell the President’s plans to other nations where their participation is desired/required.

    As such, Colin Powell was a failure as a Secretary of State though I will grant you that I don’t see how he could have done better given the situation.

    If you want to talk about what Bush has done to reconcile U.S.-Euro relations, then list the accords signed between the U.S. and European nations. Anything else is just hot air or political theatre.

    The successful candidate’s platform will resonate with the voters views.

    Precisely, and we’re more than three and a half years away from knowing what will resonate with the voters of 2008.

  9. Jsh Schlr, t’s fnny hw Fistful cnsrs ths wth th wrng pltcl vw.

    Lk kds stckng thr fngrs n thr rs. “L l l l l l lh, cn’t hr y!”

  10. Do I have to list everything Colin Powell did during the first term

    Colin Powell was appreciated enormously by many ordinary Europeans as well as professional colleagues. He was considered to be a true diplomat that could think for himself and represent views that one could relate to and discuss even if one didn’t agree with them. He was admired for his sense of humour, his professionalism, his integrity and a realism created by his having “been there” and “done that.” He listened and understood that other people can have different views and that there is no wrong and right only different shades of gray. He was a man with whom one could do business even though Europe chose not to do so at that time.

    Unfortunately, with these attributes, he cannot seriously represent his country at this period in its history.

    However, if Colin was up for world bank president, I don’t believe it would be the Europeans that would oppose things despite any lack of experience in development economics.

  11. Jsh Schlr, t’s fnny hw Fistful cnsrs ths wth th wrng pltcl vw.

    Lk kds stckng thr fngrs n thr rs. “L l l l l l lh, cn’t hr y!”

    sn’t FF rll. Jst Mrtns, th rsdnt nfnt trrbl t FF. Nw y knw wh h’s wll nt hs ‘s nd *stll* trng t gt Ph’d t rd rt r nvrst( hnt: wn’t hppn ). Wlfwtz hd hs b ( f Chcg).

    Whch bgs th qstn f Sctt thnks Wlffwtz s sch hck, wht r hs crdntls t crtcz?

  12. Ths s fn! Cn y gss wht ths sntnc mns?

    t?s lk pzzl, r rddl. Rddl m ths, Rddlr!

    f crs, f s sntnc cntnng wrds lk nmtp, btch ?d nvr fgr t t!

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