UK and German Retirement Policies Compared

As we all know raising the participation rates of older workers is both essential and a core component of the Lisbon Agenda, so here’s a timely report from the Anglo-German Foundation for the Study of Industrial Society comparing policies directed towards older workers in the UK and Germany. More salacious material to stimulate all you policy wonkers out there. (Hat Tip to David from North Sea Diaries). Looking at the table on page 3 the UK seems to have been a good deal more successful in acieving these objectives over the last decade. In both coutries male participation rates in the 55-64 age group has actually gone down since 1990, with the increase for the group as a whole being a matter of increasing female participation. On the other hand the UK has managed to reverse the 1990 – 2000 downward male trend and between 2000 and 2004 55-64 male participation went up, something which it noticably didn’t do in Germany.

The report concludes that the primary deficit concerning active labour market policies for older unemployed in Germany is the lack of specific targeting of this group both in active job placement and training. In the UK, the scope of active measures is rather limited both with regard to the kind of measures � New Deal 50 plus/New Deal 25 plus � and the level and duration of funding………In the UK � despite a more socially inclusive stance recently � funding of job creation and a broad application of training measures has not taken place so far, given the low intervention character of labour market policies. In Germany, in the wake of recent labour market reforms, a shift in paradigm towards a more activating approach to job placement has been implemented.

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About Edward Hugh

Edward 'the bonobo is a Catalan economist of British extraction. After being born, brought-up and educated in the United Kingdom, Edward subsequently settled in Barcelona where he has now lived for over 15 years. As a consequence Edward considers himself to be "Catalan by adoption". He has also to some extent been "adopted by Catalonia", since throughout the current economic crisis he has been a constant voice on TV, radio and in the press arguing in favor of the need for some kind of internal devaluation if Spain wants to stay inside the Euro. By inclination he is a macro economist, but his obsession with trying to understand the economic impact of demographic changes has often taken him far from home, off and away from the more tranquil and placid pastures of the dismal science, into the bracken and thicket of demography, anthropology, biology, sociology and systems theory. All of which has lead him to ask himself whether Thomas Wolfe was not in fact right when he asserted that the fact of the matter is "you can never go home again".