Support Iraqi democrats – get them out of Iraq

Sorry for crossposting, but this needs wider visibility. This time, Blair seems to mean it about British troops beginning to draw-down their presence in southern Iraq. All the usual provisos still apply – so far, it’s just part of the extra force that is going, and the last squaddie is scheduled to leave in three Friedman units’ time, like he has been since 2003. But this time we have a timetable within one Friedman and a number.

So it’s time to talk seriously about the people who have worked for us in Iraq. The Americans are only accepting risible numbers of refugees. 50 per cent of Iraqi refugees in Europe are in Sweden. It won’t do to claim that the situation is peachy in Iraq. The interpreters, for example, are marked men.

Back in August, 2005 I said that

Unfortunately, the best form of support the British Left can offer secular Iraqis would be to countersign their applications for political asylum. I think someone suggested this recently – perhaps we could get a Pledgebank going?

The government is still trying to force existing refugees onto aeroplanes to Irbil in Kurdistan, this being the only place not so dangerous that the law would forbid it – apparently, if you get killed between Irbil and home that’s OK. It’s high time that we went operational on this.

I’m aware that the Danish government, for example, is also trying to leave its people behind.

7 thoughts on “Support Iraqi democrats – get them out of Iraq

  1. I’m just passing through, but I’ve got a question that borders on the appropriate.

    What can a US citizen do to help resettle Iraqi refugees?

    I’m not a part of a church, or the owner of a large business that theoretically could employ people.

    Any ideas?

  2. As a fellow US citizen, the first thing you could do is write your Congressional representative and request that a law be passed that allows for greater numbers of Iraqi refugees to be allowed to immigrate to the US. In my view any Iraqi that requests asylum in the US should be granted that.

  3. What has
    “Support Iraqi democrats – get them out of Iraq”

    with

    “So it’s time to talk seriously about the people who have worked for us in Iraq.”

    The overlap between those two groups isn’t that large especially considering that the US want a DDR type democracy in Iraq.

    Interpreters, at least who don’t work for the resistance, are plainly traitors and should be dealt with as the traitors they are.

  4. I’d love to see a cite for the US wanting a “DDR-style democracy” in Iraq. Wasn’t Iraq pre-invasion actually not much different to that?

    More broadly, do you usually want people whose politics you disagree with beheaded? Or is this a special case?

  5. If i look at how the US government reacted to the elections in Venezuela, Nicaragua or Palestina than it is unmistaken that they want the same type of democracy that the Soviets wanted in their satelites. Every few years elections which their man won. They even could handle it when their man didn’t win (like in Roumania) but they will use force if their enemies seem to win.

    Saddam won elections with 99.87% of the vote. This was not true of all the Warsaw countries. Often the We-will-always-follow-the-communist farmers party got something like 20%

    It is not their politics i find objectionable but their way of life. I don’t trust people who so obvious betray their country. Objectively the baathist are more in line with Western values, but they are unlikely to be in the service of the occupying forces. This leaves the fundies and i believe that the majority prefers them against the wall instead of being here

  6. I’m sorry, but that’s repellent. Everybody’s the minority at least once.

    And this is ridiculous: Objectively the baathist are more in line with Western values, but they are unlikely to be in the service of the occupying forces. This leaves the fundies and i believe that the majority prefers them against the wall instead of being here

    What kind of “fundies” are in the service of the occupying forces? And if you’re talking fundamentalists in Iraq, you’re talking “the people the vast majority of non-Kurdish Iraqis vote for”.

  7. The shiite groups are fundamentalist. That the majority of the Iraqi’s voted for them is secondary.

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