German Election Primer

With only one night left to sleep before German voters (about 10 million of whom are allegedly still “undecided”) will be asked to decide about the composition of the next Bundestag, and probably, though not necessarily, about the composition of their next government, Spiegel Online’s English language service kindly prepared a contextualised (links to articles they published on specific issues) primer about the bumpy road this year’s contenders had to take to get into the Chancellery. Useful – and hopefully interesting – Saturday afternoon reading for everone who doesn’t feel too comfortable yet about the intricacies of German politics.

This entry was posted in A Fistful Of Euros, Germany and tagged by Tobias Schwarz. Bookmark the permalink.

About Tobias Schwarz

German, turned 30 a while ago, balding slowly, hopefully with grace. A carnival junkie, who, after studies in business and politics in Mannheim, Paris, and London, is currently living in his hometown of Mainz, Germany, again. Became New Labourite during a research job at the House of Commons, but difficult to place in German party-political terms. Liberal in the true sense of the term.

His political writing is mostly on A Fistful of Euros and on facebook these days. Occasional Twitter user and songwriter. His personal blog is almost a diary. Even more links at about.me.

2 thoughts on “German Election Primer

  1. Arguably the best site covering the German election system is http://www.wahlrecht.de (mostly in German, some parts also in English).

    Even those who consider themselves political literate might still learn some interesting details.

    Ever heard of “negative voting power” (negatives Stimmgewicht) for instance?
    No?
    In a nutshell: In the German voting system it is possible that additional votes cast for a party actually DECREASE the number of parliamentary seats the party gets. Sounds incredible – but is true nonetheless.
    In the last election for example, the SPD would have gained an addtional seat, if less people in Bremen had voted red…

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