It’s Baaack: Looming Greek Elections Threaten To Re-ignite the Euro Crisis

If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again……  aka third time unlucky.

The Euro crisis has all the signs of being back amongst us, and this time it may be here to stay. After two earlier false alerts – one in July around the collapse of the Portuguese Banco Espirito Santo, and another in October over the state of the Greek bailout negotiations – the announcement this week that the Greek presidential decision was being brought forward to December has sent the markets reeling off into a complete tizzy. Continue reading

Three economic history papers you should totally read

The Berkeley Economic History Lab is blogging a lot of its recent working papers, and they’re a goldmine of great stuff. Here’s Richard Sutch writing in October this year, whose The Liquidity Trap, the Great Depression, and Unconventional Policy: Reading Keynes at the Zero Lower Bound basically recovers an important idea from the General Theory and Keynes’ practice during the Depression.

Sutch’s gloss of Keynes is that an important way in which the zero lower bound constraint bites is that there is always a term-structure of interest rates, rather than anything like a single economywide rate of interest. As a result, even if short rates hit the ZLB or even go negative, a large segment of the yield spectrum will still be significantly positive. This of course has some consequences for the debate about when Keynes broke with the Wicksellian idea of a single market interest rate that might deviate from a full-employment natural rate.

He argues that Keynes micro-founded this on differences between the risk profiles of borrowers and lenders. Borrowers and lenders both face the risk that whatever enterprise is being financed will fail and the loan won’t be paid off. Borrowers stand to lose whatever security is put down for the loan, while lenders stand to lose the difference between the security and the principal (i.e. their risk is fundamentally about estimating how much security is enough). In theory, arbitrage should transmit lower rates at the short end along the whole curve, because if you can borrow for a year and roll it over cheaper than you can borrow for 5 years, you will.

But here’s the problem; lenders bring their own idiosyncratic risk to the table. Each event of refinancing brings with it the risk that potential lenders have become illiquid, a so-called sudden stop. This always exists unless the life of the loan matches the life of the asset exactly, and it is an attribute of lenders, not borrowers. Therefore, long-term credit comes at a premium, and in a sense what is “long” is defined in relation to the typical life of capital investments.

Therefore, it’s quite possible for the policy rate to hit zero or even theoretically drive through the ZLB, while a large proportion of the universe of credit still has significantly positive real interest rates. This implies that unconventional policy of some sort – perhaps a combination of QE and an “Operation Twist”-like effort to target long rates, or direct fiscal reflation – would be needed and that’s what the man concluded.

An example of the sudden stop would be another of their papers, Olivier Accominotti and Barry Eichengreen’s The Mother of All Sudden Stops: Capital Flows and Reversals in Europe, 1919-1932. In this one, Accominotti and Eichengreen have literally discovered a trove of historical documents in an archive. It’s a catalogue of major capital-raising exercises in Europe in the 1920s and 1930s, covering the major financial centres and most of the second tier as well. The conclusion is that the rolling financial crisis starting with Creditanstalt in 1931, defined as a sudden stop of international lending followed by capital flight, was driven by volatility in the stock market – it was, in fact, the Great Crash and its lesser crashes that did it. The correlation with volatility in world equities was much higher than with any economic variable in the countries affected.

An example of policy would be Eric Monnet’s Financing a Planned Economy: Institutions and Credit Allocation in the French Golden Age of Growth (1954-1974). This one comes from Paris School of Economics – surely the fac Piketty these days – and you can tell because it’s crunchy with empiricism. Monnet has constructed a database of lending registered with the Banque de France that provides series into very detailed industrial sectors, and another one of firms’ operating results based on tax returns, going through what sounds like epic pain to match the excisemen’s classification up with the central bankers’ and further with the national statistics. The key result is that the change in the state-directed, or as he would put it, state-influenced lending was very strongly correlated with internal rates of return, implying that the system worked well as an allocator of capital.

He’s also done a lot of qualitative work to understand how the French financial sector worked at the time. It was a lot more complicated and subtle than the caricature of being directed by the government, and it evolved over time. To begin with, a lot of lending really was directed by government and issued by the finance ministry, mostly to large capital projects in infrastructure and heavy industry. With time, the heavy lifting moved to a new layer of specialist lenders who faced projects in manufacturing, housing, and tourism. Influence rather than control was very much the point. The key financial product was long-term lending of 5 years plus.

There’s much more stuff in there – the fall of the USSR in a trade perspective, equities and anti-Semitism, Ottoman and Austrian administration and their long-term effects on growth.

Abenomics 2.0 – Just What Are They Trying To Achieve?

The recent move by the Bank of Japan to take further measures to accelerate the rate at which it ramps up its balance sheet took almost everyone – market watchers included – completely by surprise. The consequence was reasonably predictable – the yen has once more fallen strongly against almost all major currencies – and most notably against the USD – and Japan’s main stock indexes are sharply up. Continue reading

Does The Secular Stagnation Theory Have Any Sort of Validity?

In a number of blog-posts (Paul Krugman’s Bicycling Problem, On Bubble Business Bound, The Expectations Fairy) I have examined some of the implications of the theory of secular stagnation. But I haven’t up to now argued why I think the hypothesis that Japan and some parts of Europe are suffering from some kind of secular stagnation could well be a valid one.

Strangely, while I would suggest the most obviously affected countries are those mentioned above, most of the debate has centered around the US economy. Since it is not at all clear that the US economy is actually suffering from either a liquidity trap or secular stagnation at this point, this has lead many to question whether the idea might not be ill-founded. The Economist, for example, in a revue article (Fad or Fact) of Teulings and Baldwin’s Vox e-book  on the topic conclude the concept “remains a baggy one”, one which is “arguably too capacious for its own good”. Continue reading

Eurocrisis Round Two, Blame the Germans Edition

“What strikes me, also, is the extent of intellectual confusion that remains.” – Paul Krugman, Europanic 2.0

“The problem is that Germany has continued to maintain highly competitive labor costs and run huge surpluses since the bubble burst — and that in a depressed world economy, this makes Germany a significant part of the problem.” – Paul Krugman, German Surpluses: This Time Is Different

According to one fairly widespread (and recently much in vogue) theory about the Euro crisis, Germany bears a large part of the responsibility for the current mess. The view is met with a variety of responses inside the country, ranging from horror to amazement. Naturally, if the argument were simply about the way Angela Merkel has handled the crisis – no Eurobonds, no debt forgiveness, systematic fiscal austerity – then possibly some of it could be understood. But no, things go beyond that, Germany has been too successful, too competitive, and this has presented a big problem for its partners who simply haven’t been able to keep up. Continue reading

Is Japan Back In Recession?

“People should seriously consider that Japan’s economy may have fallen into recession despite the weaker yen and a stock rally from the BOJ’s easing and the flexible fiscal policy by Abe’s administration,” said Maiko Noguchi, senior economist at Daiwa Securities. “Initial expectations that the economy could withstand the negative effects of a sales tax hike through a virtuous circle seem to be collapsing.”

“the risks are rising that the economy will later be determined to be in recession,” said Yuji Shimanaka,  chief economist at Mitsubishi UFJ Morgan Stanley Securities Co.

Worsening Picture

As noted in my post – Does Abenomics Work? -  (published 19 September) the tide of media opinion finally seems to be turning against Shinzo Abe and his economic reform plan for Japan known as “Abenomics”. The degree of skepticism being shown only seems to have grown on the back of a slew of recent data confirming the impression that the recovery of economic activity from the post sales-tax slump isn’t going to be as easy as either the Japanese government or the Bank of Japan initially thought it would be. As the authors of the Bloomberg report from which the above quotes are taken – Oops Japan Did It Again? Sales-Tax Spurs Recession Debate – put it: “Weak industrial production data from Japan today raises concern that the world’s third-largest economy may be back in recession, challenging Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s growth strategy.” In fact, output which was down 1.5% between July and August (and down 2.9% over August 2013) has fallen in three of the past five months.

Continue reading

The Japanisation Of Europe

By now it should be clear that the monetary experiment currently being carried out in Japan (known as “Abenomics”) is fundamentally different from the kind of quantitative easing which was implemented  in the United States and the United Kingdom during the global financial crisis. In the US and the UK QE was implemented in order to stabilize the financial system, while in Japan, and now the Euro Area (EA) the objective is to end deflationary pressures and reflate economies which are arguably caught in some form of liquidity trap. Continue reading

Does Abenomics Work? – The Doubts Grow

Is something in the air? Do I detect a change in consensus on the way things are going in Japan? Certainly a slew of articles have been published in the financial press over the last month questioning where the Abenomics experiment is headed for. The general conclusion seems to be that wherever it is it is certainly not the originally designated endpoint. Continue reading

The Catalan Vote: Why It’s Time To Start Getting Worried About Complacency In Madrid

When Barack Obama told a CNBC interviewer last autumn that Wall Street ought to be “genuinely worried about what is going on in Washington” in reference to the US government shutdown he raised more than a few eyebrows. Normally political leaders try to calm and reassure markets, so this attempt to stir them up on the part of the US President was, in its way, something of a first.

Last May the Financial Times issued a similar warning in an editorial with a clear message: right now you should be more worried than you are about what is happening in Madrid. According to the newspaper, “secessionist demands have created a rolling crisis involving Catalonia and the national government in Madrid,” a crisis which it warns could end in a “head on collision” if the issues being raised are not addressed. Continue reading

Secular Stagnation Part III – The Expectations Fairy

“So what’s going on here? Well, it might sound like a hokey religion, but central banking is really a Jedi mind trick. Just saying something can be enough to make it happen. That’s because the power of the printing press gives their words a distinct power. Well, that and the fact that the economy is already one big self-fulfilling prophecy.” – Matt O’brien,  “Abenomics has only worked because foreigners think it willContinue reading