A Splash of Cold Water

Posted without comment, except for the heading:

Addressing his supporters earlier, Mr Yushchenko said “those people who will raise the issue of separatism will be held criminally responsible under the Ukrainian constitution”.

Story.

10 thoughts on “A Splash of Cold Water

  1. Pop goes the button. I removed the Democracy for Ukraine button from my blog.

    I have yet to read a clarification of this statement, but taking it at face value it made me realize that I should not be supporting, not even implicitly through a well-meant button, any of the candidates as such because I know too little about them. I shall, however, continue to support the Ukrainian people in their quest for democracy.

    Love to hear more about this.

  2. Possible (beginning of) clarification now on my blog. It is maybe about Article 110 of the new Ukraine penal code.

    “We call on the participants in the congress to hold back from taking any decisions that could threaten the territorial integrity of Ukraine. The National Salvation Committee warns that the people who are responsible for calling for separatism are committing a crime, and that they will suffer severe consequences according to Article 110 of the Criminal Code of Ukraine,? he said.”

    Quote taken from the Kyiv post. Anybody out here who can provide the full text of this Article 110?

  3. It’s pretty clear what is going on here.

    The oligarchs in the East tried to steal the elections for their guy. They failed and think they will lose. So now they are trying to split the country aand secede with their part.

    Notice that the mayor of Moscow appeared next to Yanukovich at this meeting. What is the mayor of the capital of a neighboring country doing at a secessionist congress?

    Moscow really isn’t looking good here.

  4. See article 2.

    On the other hand, see articles 134-39. Nothing in Yushchenko’s remark precludes the eastern regions from asking for (or receiving) the same kind of autonomy that the Crimea has.

    At any rate, I find it neither surprising nor particularly disturbing that Yushchenko is responding to the regional governments’ saber-rattling with a little posturing of his own. If he wins the presidency, I expect that there will be quite a few threats of secession and countercharges of treason, but that the two sides will eventually agree on federalism and co-official status for the Russian language. Yushchenko doesn’t strike me as a chauvinist and the Crimea precedent exists for a federalist safety valve, so

  5. Yushchenko doesn’t strike me as a chauvinist and the Crimea precedent exists for a federalist safety valve, so…

    … I’d rate the likelihood of compromise as higher than that of any of the more extreme outcomes.

  6. I always find it disturbing when politicians (or anybody, for that matter) call for criminal prosecution for “raising the issue” of anything. Even if it’s just posturing, and even if it’s in the constitution.

  7. I always find it disturbing when politicians (or anybody, for that matter) call for criminal prosecution for “raising the issue” of anything.

    Granted. I’m a free-speech absolutist myself, and I don’t like the idea of people being prosecuted for seditious words. Given the circumstances, though, I’m inclined to cut Yushchenko some slack. Statements made in the heat of battle don’t count as much as statements made after deliberation, much less actions.

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